NSCA New York State Clinic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you like getting stronger?  Do you like when other people get stronger?  Are you a strength coach, personal trainer, or fitness enthusiast?  Are you living near Buffalo, New York?  Hell yea you are, and I have good news for you!

The National Strength and Conditioning Association will be holding the New York State Clinic this Saturday, August 3rd, hosted at Buffalo State College’s Bulger Communications Center (West).  The clinic will cover  topics ranging from athletic development and injury prevention to agility and percentage training.  Here’s the run down:

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Neck Testing and Training Methods for Football by Ryan Cidzik, MS, CSCS
Coach Cidzik has developed to help prevent concussions in the sport of football, as well as other sports.
Injury Prevention in Youth Athletes by Laura Neuburger, DPT
Injuries are becoming much more common in athletes today. The presentation will touch on a few of the major reasons (such as early specialization, increased volume, development of poor movement patterns) and the health care professional’s role in helping treat and prevent these injuries. Also discussed will be the integration between the athlete, sports coach, strength staff, and health care team to ensure proper safety in youth sports.
Speed and Agility Training in the Team Setting by William Hicks, CSCS, RSCC*E
Skills, drills and progression of athletes that need speed and agility work.
A Movement-Based Approach to Strength & Conditioning by Harold Gibbons, CSCS, NSCA-CPT
Examination of exercise strategies that emphasizes quality of movement in all planes to promote performance and reduce injury risk.
Training Percentages: How and Why to Use Them in Your Training by Nate Young, MS, CSCS
This topic will cover the importance of using percentages of maximum in training and how to figure out weight for other
lifts based on percentages of known maxes.
Long-Term Athletic Development: Shaping a Career by Bill Rom
Athletes will take part in a training program at various points in their careers. When introducing movements and drills, be sure to recognize the stage of motor learning that they are currently in. By understanding motor learning, and the process by which athletes acquire skill, we can better integrate programming, and improve results, while creating realistic expectations.
After the last presentation, we’ll be hosting a Question & Answer session for the audience and presenters, allowing for collaboration and discussion about the topics that were discussed.
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If you’re in the Buffalo area, you’re in for a real treat at the conference.  The breadth of information will allow anyone to find aspects of their training that they’ll be able to augment with applicable information.  Plus, there will be a number of awesomely hilarious jokes about sci-fi and assorted geekdom.
The link to the NSCA website is right HERE.  <– Click me!
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